Posts Tagged ‘trek’

Road bike warranties

What warranty coverage do some of the big road bike manufacturers offer on their frames?

  • Condor – 2 years – read more
  • Wilier – 4 years (5 years if registered online 10 days from purchase) – read more
  • Look – 5 years
  • Canyon – 6 years – read more
  • Felt – lifetime
  • Trek – lifetime – read more
  • Parlee – lifetime – read more
  • Specialized – lifetime – read more

Naturally, the precise terms of all these will differ – but the list gives an idea of the range. By all accounts, Trek is the daddy of bike warranties. Joe is onto the fourth or fifth incarnation of his Madone 7.2 frame, which has persistently developed a crack in exactly the same place on the seat tube.

Damien Hirst Madone

Damien Hirst styles the Trek Madone.

Damien Hirst styles the Trek Madone.

Trek has commissioned a number of high-profile designers to design new paint schemes for its range of Madone road bikes. Check out the Damien Hirst gallery and lots more via the Trek Flickr stream

Via @lancearmstrong.

Wilier Mortirolo 08

I was in a happy relationship with my Wilier Mortirolo Veloce 2007 for a year after we got together. Then I went to France and picked up / rode / stroked Joe‘s Trek Madone 6.9. Suddenly the Wilier felt decidedly hefty…

The trouble with cycling is that the more you ride the more you demand from your bike, and the more performance you realise can be delivered by a lighter, more expensive machine.

But for sure I still like my bike. At 16 months old the drivetrain is getting a bit sticky, but other than that it still feels stiff, responsive and flickable. The time is ripe for a series of upgrades to take the Wilier to the next level – so it’s heartening to read the bikeradar.com review of the 2008 version of my bike.

2008 model

 
I quote (note the ‘Veloce version’ refers to my bike):

The Wilier’s frame is absolutely first class…

Although it doesn’t perform quite as well as the Veloce version we tested last year, our Mirage-equipped Wilier displays most of the same fundamental traits. The overall ride feel is fairly aggressive and when you push harder you get an instant response whether you’re on flat roads or climbing. Put the hammer down for an all-out sprint and the Mortirolo is up for that too, and it takes on corners in the same assured manner. On top of all that, descending is sure-footed enough to inspire bags of confidence, the steering is bang on and it smooths out rough surfaces without ever a second thought.

If we do have a negative comment, it’s that the Wilier is under-specced for the quality of its frame. The positive spin on that, though, is that if you do decide to buy this bike, you could gradually upgrade the components as they wear out without much danger of out-classing the chassis.